Nebraska Bookworms

Stacks and Bookworms

The Plattsmouth Book Club loves books, and we invite you to join us in savoring them.

We meet the first Saturday of each month, 10 a.m. at the Plattsmouth Public Library, Plattsmouth, Nebraska. Everyone is welcome to attend, whether you've read the current selection or not.

Come join us!

 

Free and almost-free online audio book resources
Librivox
Loyalbooks
Mindwebs (sci-fi)
Open Culture
Overdrive
Project Gutenberg
Free Classic Books
Digital Book
Audible

 

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Member Information

Book Options

July 

The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia by Masha Gessen. Gessen, a contributor to many US periodicals and newspapers, is the Russian born author of our chilling February 2013 selection The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin. The recipient of numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Carnegie Fellowship, Gessen has lived in both Russia (born to a Jewish family there) and the US. She teaches at Bard College and lives in New York City. She has been sought after of late for her insights into the Ukraine situation.

In The Future (written five years ago) Gessen follows the lives of four people born at what promised to be the dawn of democracy in Russia.   Each of them came of age with unprecedented expectations, some as the children and grandchildren of the very architects of the new Russia, each with newfound aspirations of their own. Gessen charts their paths against the machinations of the regime that would crush them all, and against the war it waged on understanding itself, which ensured the unobstructed reemergence of the old Soviet order in the form of today's terrifying and seemingly unstoppable mafia state.

or

Great Influenza by John Barry. Study of the 1918 influenza pandemic.

 

Please send title suggestions to Susanne or Carol.

Please check our revised listing of upcoming selections for future reads. Don't forget to send your suggestions to the webmaster to add to our list.

Looking Ahead

August 

The Last Man WHo Knew Everuthing: The Life and Times of Enrico Fermi, Father of the Nuclear Age by David N Schwartz. Fermi grew up in Rome in the early 1900s and showed brilliance as a child prodigy. Just prior to the start of WWII, he escaped Italy’s Mussolini with his family for America and soon found himself working on the Manhattan Project. No need to be intimidated by the science, the author whose father is also a Nobel prize winner in particle physics, has written for the general audience.  

or

Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie. Murder on a glamourous river steamer in Egypt.

 

September 

Other Minds: The Octopus, the Sea, and the Deep Origins of Consciousness by Peter Godfrey-Smith. This selection was shortlisted for the 2017 Royal Society Science Book Prize and has since been published in more than twenty languages. As a scuba-diving philosopher of science, he explores the wonder of cephalopods, smart and playful creatures who live outside the brain-body divide. By tracing the question of inner life back to its roots and comparing human beings with our most remarkable animal relatives, Australian Godfrey-Smith casts crucial new light on the octopus mind—and on our own.

or

Lions of 5th Avenue by Fiona Davis. Novel about two women and their experiences with the New York City Public Library.