Nebraska Bookworms

Stacks and Bookworms

The Plattsmouth Book Club loves books, and we invite you to join us in savoring them.

We meet the first Saturday of each month, 10 a.m. at the Plattsmouth Public Library, Plattsmouth, Nebraska. Everyone is welcome to attend, whether you've read the current selection or not.

Come join us!

 

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August 4
The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings: J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Owen Barfield, Charles Williams by Philip Zaleski and Carol Zaleski. C. S. Lewis is the 20th century's most widely read Christian writer and J.R.R. Tolkien its most beloved mythmaker. For three decades, they and their closest associates formed a literary club known as the Inklings, which met every week in Lewis's Oxford rooms and in nearby pubs. They discussed literature, religion, and ideas; read aloud from works in progress; took philosophical rambles in woods and fields; gave one another companionship and criticism; and, in the process, rewrote the cultural history of modern times.  / An American Memory by Eric Larsen (not our familiar Erik Larson). A novel about three generations of a Midwestern family is a powerful and quietly moving narrative revealed in exquisitely rendered fragments. Young Malcolm's childhood takes place on the Reiner family farm in Minnesota where his grandparents, descended from Norwegian pioneer stock, settled, and, like dust, are still settling as Malcolm sifts the evidence of his family's past. Central to this sensitive narrator's search is his father's implicit disapproval; Malcolm is awed by this restless and silently angry man who dominates a room even when asleep. Malcolm must find connections with his family by rummaging through a trunk of relics in the attic, and he comes to know its various members' life stories by observation and deduction, as one might study an overgrown landscape for clues of hidden rocks formations.


Please send title suggestions to Susanne or Carol.

Please check our revised listing of upcoming selections for future reads. Don't forget to send your suggestions to the webmaster to add to our list.

Looking Ahead

 

September 1 — The Mighty Pen
Reader's Choice, any banned book. Any country, any language, any era. Discuss the circumstances surrounding the ban and subsequent events. Help us explore the poiwer of the written word, so powerful it can prompts those in authority to seek suppression of those words.

October 6
Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow. Few figures in American history have been more hotly debated than Alexander Hamilton. Chernow’s biography deftly illustrates the political and economic greatness of today’s America is the result of Hamilton’s countless sacrifices to champion ideas that were often wildly disputed. Chernow here recounts Hamilton’s turbulent life: an illegitimate, largely self-taught orphan from the Caribbean, he came out of nowhere to take America by storm, rising to become George Washington’s aide-de-camp in the Continental Army, coauthoring The Federalist Papers, founding the Bank of New York, leading the Federalist Party, and becoming the first Treasury Secretary of the United States.  Since writing this biography which became the basis for the Broadway musical “Hamilton” (coming to Omaha in 2018-19), Chernow has written a biography of George Washington, profiles of the Morgans and Warburgs, and, most recently, an acclaimed biography of US Grant. / I Know why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou. Sent by their mother to live with their devout, self-sufficient grandmother in a small Southern town, Maya and her brother, Bailey, endure the ache of abandonment and the prejudice of the local “powhitetrash.” At eight years old and back at her mother’s side in St. Louis, Maya is attacked by a man many times her age—and has to live with the consequences for a lifetime. Years later, in San Francisco, Maya learns that love for herself, the kindness of others, her own strong spirit, and the ideas of great authors (“I met and fell in love with William Shakespeare”) will allow her to be free instead of imprisoned.